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Starbeamrainbowlabs Tjovik

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A computer science student who loves to explore and learn new things.

Blog posts

Automatically rotating log files on Linux

I'm rather busy at the moment with University, but I thought I'd post about Linux's log rotating system, which I've discovered recently. This post is best read as a follow-up to my earlier post, creating a system service with systemd, in which I talk about how to write a systemd service file - and how to send the output of your program to syslog - which will put it in /var/log for you. Log rotatin… Read more →


ASP.NET: First Impressions

Admittedly, I haven't really got too far into ASP.NET (core). I've only gone through the first few tutorials or so, and based on what I've found so far, I've decided that it warrants a full first impressions blog post. ASP.NET is fascinating, because it takes the design goals centred around developer efficiency and combines them with the likes of PHP to provide a framework with which one can write… Read more →


Troubleshooting my dotnet setup

I've recently been setting up dotnet on my Artix Linux laptop for my course at University. While I'm unsure precisely what dotnet is intended to do (and how it's different to Mono), my current understanding is that it's an implementation of .NET Core intended for developing and running ASP.NET web applications (there might be more on ASP.NET in a later 'first impressions' post soon-ish). While the… Read more →


Animated PNG for all!

I recently discovered that Animated PNGs are now supported by most major browsers: by Starbeamrainbowlabs | 17-2-2019 at 09:00 am | Bash, Web, Graphics | Permanent Link | 0 comments | Share via: Read more →


Generating Atom 1.0 Feeds with PHP (the proper way)

I've generated Atom feeds in PHP before, but recently I went on the hunt to discover if PHP has something like C♯'s XMLWriter class - and it turns out it does! Although poorly documented (probably why I didn't find it in the first place :P), it's actually quite logical and easy to pick up. To this end, I thought I'd blog about how I used to write the Atom 1.0 feed generator for recent changes on P… Read more →


Building Javascript (and other things) with Rollup

Hey, another blog post! Recently I've been somewhat distracted by another project which has been most interesting. I've learnt a bunch of things (including getting started with LeafletJS and Chart.JS), but most notably I've been experimenting with another Javascript build system. I've used quite a few build systems over the years. For the uninitiated, their primary purpose is to turn lots of separ… Read more →


Bridging the gap between XMPP and shell scripts

In a previous post, I set up a semi-automated backup system for my Raspberry Pi using duplicity, sendxmpp, and an external drive. It's been working fabulously for a while now, but unfortunately the other week sendxmpp suddenly stopped working with no obvious explanation. Given the long list of arguments I had to pass it: sendxmpp --file "${xmpp_config_file}" --resource "${xmpp_resource}" --tls --c… Read more →


Compilers, VMs, and JIT: Spot the difference

It's about time for another demystification post, I think :P This time, I'm going to talk about Compilers, Virtual Machines (VMs), and Just-In-Time Compilation (JIT) - and the way that they are both related and yet different. Compilers To start with, a compiler is a program that converts another program written in 1 language into another language (usually of a lower level). For example, gcc compil… Read more →


Setup your very own VPN in 10 minutes flat

Hey! Happy new year :-) I've been looking to setup a personal VPN for a while, and the other week I discovered a rather brilliant project called PiVPN, which greatly simplifies the process of setting one up - and managing it thereafter. It's been working rather well so far, so I thought I'd post about it so you can set one up for yourself too. But first though, we should look at the why. Why a VPN… Read more →


Where in the world does spam come from?

Answer: The US, apparently. I was having a discussion with someone recently, and since I have a rather extensive log of comment failures for debugging & analysis purposes (dating back to February 2015!) they suggested that I render a map of where the spam is coming from. It was such a good idea that I ended up doing just that - and somehow also writing this blog post :P First, let's start off by l… Read more →